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One Bullet Dan
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 10:07am | IP Logged Quote One Bullet Dan

I can spot a chunk of lead in a garbage pile from twenty feet away, but I know nothing of scrap tin sources. What is it used in? How can you tell the difference between tin and aluminum?
I`ve been told that a lot of condenser coils, like in dehumidifiers, refrigeration units, air conditioners, etc. have tin coils, but they look like aluminum to me.
What do you do? Chuck it in a melting pot and see what the melting point is?

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Raven
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 12:40pm | IP Logged Quote Raven

Check out the pewter string.


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richhodg66
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 1:47pm | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

I've been told older refrigerators had tin coils, but I don't think they have been for quite some time.

A few years ago at a demolition project of old housing units on Fort Riley, the crew let me go around and smash pipe joints of old iron water pipes and take the solder rings from them. I probably got nearly a pound of it from each one, and it's not pure lead because it didn't do well with the plains bullet I cast for muzzle loader, but it melts a lot hotter than wheel weights do. I've been kind of wondering over the years what, if any, the tin content of that solder is. ANybody a plumber in here?

I haven't used any pewter yet, but have managed to collect up a couple or three pounds of it over the past year.

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STCM(SW)
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 2:35pm | IP Logged Quote STCM(SW)

We use to lightly bite on tin, if it made a crackling sound, it was tin.

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Ominivision1
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 9:23pm | IP Logged Quote Ominivision1

I've been servicing HVAC for just about 30 years and have never seen a tin evap or cond. They were either copper, copper alloy, or aluminum. Aluminum is non magnetic and most tin is magnetic, however there is also tin that is not magnetic.

Edited by Ominivision1 on December 19 2010 at 9:25pm


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Paul5388
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 9:39pm | IP Logged Quote Paul5388

Tin looks a lot like zinc, but it makes noises, like creaking, if you twist on it in its pure form. Most of the old tin is actually tin plate, like in the old cream separators. I had one plated in St. Louis back 10 or 15 years ago.

The melting point is what you can really tell about, since it melts close to where lead melts. Zinc has a higher melting point, so if it melts about like lead it's tin, not zinc. You could melt it off of plated objects, but there probably isn't enough there to justify the process.

Tin is also more toxic than lead, so I'd just be satisfied with wheel weight mixes for my bullets needing tin content.

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Paul B.
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 10:17pm | IP Logged Quote Paul B.

Well if you really need to get some tin, hike on down to lowes or Home Depot and check out the 95/5 percent lead free solder. It's not cheap but a little goes a long way.
Check out the contents. While they all should work, some have copper (won't hurt) and some have silver. The one with silver is the one I use. depending on what alloy I'm using, I can use a one foot piece to sweeten the pot or up to three feet when mixing up a favored alloy. I never have unrolled a full roll to see how much material is there but I've made up quite a few pots of bullet metal in the last two years and still have half a roll. You could start out with 6" and see how the melt cast. If you need a bit more add another 6" and so on but you should never have to go over three feet. You only need at most 2 percent tin to the mix. Anything more is a waste and if you bullet metal is something like wheel weights, you really don't need to add very much. It's not the least expensive alternative but if you can't find anything else???????
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STCM(SW)
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 10:18pm | IP Logged Quote STCM(SW)

"Tin is also more toxic than lead"

If that's so, why were all the pipes from the ballantine beer brewery made out of tin?
That is were I got most of my tin when they went out of business many years ago.

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STCM(SW)
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 10:26pm | IP Logged Quote STCM(SW)

Tin

Tin is a soft, pliable, silvery-white metal. Tin is not easily oxidized and resists corrosion because it is protected by an oxide film. Tin resists corrosion from distilled sea and soft tap water, and can be attacked by strong acids, alkalis and acid salts.

Applications

Tin is used in for can coating: tin-plated steel containers are widely used for food preservation. Tin alloys are employed in many ways: as solder for joining pipes or electric circuits, pewter, bell metal, babbit metal and dental amalgams. The niobium-tin alloy is used for superconductiong magnets, tin oxide is used for ceramics and in gas sensors (as it absorbs a gas its electrical conmductivity increases and this can be monitored). Tin foil was once a common wrapping material for foods and drugs, now replaced by the use of aluminium foil.




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nascflattracker
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 10:44pm | IP Logged Quote nascflattracker

hey dan look for solder made in the last 30yr in home const is 50-50 or to all tin in small rolls there at garage sells for sure .printers type set is lynole lead which is good also. i haven't found any of that but would like to try some lynole lead ?

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Paul5388
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Posted: December 19 2010 at 11:08pm | IP Logged Quote Paul5388

MC,

If you will check the LD50 on tin and compare it to lead, you'll find the dose needed to be toxic is much smaller with tin.

Here's Rotometal's MSDS on their bullet lead with the LD50. https://www.rotometals.com/v/vspfiles/downloadables/MSDS_Tin _Antimony_Lead_Alloy.pdf

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One Bullet Dan
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Posted: December 20 2010 at 6:14am | IP Logged Quote One Bullet Dan

Thanks, Gentlemen. Sounds like I`m chasing rainbows as far as finding scrap; pewter and soldier sounds like my best bet.
I`ve heard that radiator shops can be a source. Might have to check that out after the new year.

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Raven
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Posted: December 20 2010 at 7:21am | IP Logged Quote Raven

Don't be concerned with tin toxicity; it is very stable chemically and hard for
the body to absorb, and what little it does is easily excreted, unlike lead.
LD50 are rarely relevant to humans (can't test them) and are based on animal
models that don't always reflect human behavior.

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dahermit
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Posted: December 20 2010 at 10:46am | IP Logged Quote dahermit

"...most tin is magnetic..."
The ONLY metals that are magnetic are: Ferric metals (those that contain iron), and Nickle, which is "slightly" magnetic. Tin is not magnetic. Any metallurgy textbook will tell you that.

"...The melting point is what you can really tell about, since it melts close to where lead melts." Tin melts at a little over 400 degrees F. Lead melts at a little over 600 degrees F. Aluminum melts at a little over 1000 degrees F. So, if it melts easily, it is likely Tin.

A source of tin, albeit not a real good source, is the metal tubes that different products sometimes come in. Toothpaste used to be in metal (tin) tubes, but they are mostly plastic now. Nevertheless, any of those metal squeeze tubes are tin, but you would have to melt a lot of them to get much tin.

Edited by dahermit on December 20 2010 at 10:49am
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Lloyd Smale
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Posted: December 21 2010 at 5:25am | IP Logged Quote Lloyd Smale

if you have a local radiator repair shop go there and ask them for the drippings that come from when they rebuild radiators. Its 60/40 lead/tin and most shops will give it away free. Its a bit of work to smelt down as its full of all kinds of crap but its good free solder
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Ominivision1
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Posted: December 21 2010 at 7:17am | IP Logged Quote Ominivision1

dahermit wrote:
"...most tin is magnetic..."
The ONLY metals that are magnetic are: Ferric metals (those that contain iron), and Nickle, which is "slightly" magnetic. Tin is not magnetic. Any metallurgy textbook will tell you that.


Tin (along with oxygen and aluminum) is paramagnetic. They have unpaired electrons. The cancellation of magnetic moments belonging to the electrons is incomplete. Therefore, they have a net or permanent magnetic moment even in the absence of an externally applied field. Molecules like this, with permanent magnetic moments, are called paramagnetic. Although paramagnetic substances (like tin) are attracted to a magnet, the effect is almost as feeble as diamagnetism. The reason is that the permanent moments are continually knocked out of alignment with the field by thermal vibration.

Magnetic Properties of Tin

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dahermit
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Posted: December 21 2010 at 3:15pm | IP Logged Quote dahermit

"Tin (along with oxygen and aluminum) is paramagnetic. They have unpaired electrons. The cancellation of magnetic moments belonging to the electrons is incomplete. Therefore, they have a net or permanent magnetic moment even in the absence of an externally applied field. Molecules like this, with permanent magnetic moments, are called paramagnetic. Although paramagnetic substances (like tin) are attracted to a magnet, the effect is almost as feeble as diamagnetism. The reason is that the permanent moments are continually knocked out of alignment with the field by thermal vibration. "

Your superior metallurgical knowledge not withstanding, Tin is NOT attracted to a magnet. Therefore, a magnet is going to be of no utility in determining if a scrap of metal is Tin or not.



Edited by dahermit on December 21 2010 at 3:20pm
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LARGECALIBERMAN
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Posted: December 28 2010 at 2:22pm | IP Logged Quote LARGECALIBERMAN

The best ever source of tin (for me) is at a radiator shop. About two years ago, I acquired almost 2000 lbs of radiator drippings. This old radiator repair shop was going out of business and the owner had me clean off his trough with the drippings from all the radiators he repaired over the years. I hauled away almost 7 55 gallon drums or "rubbish" from the trough and barrels of drippings he had laying around. After going through cigarett butts, chewing gum, and dirt, I ended up with 7 5-gallon buckets full with 1/2lb and 1 lb ingots (Lee ingot mold).

Although this is not PURE tin, most radiator shops and radiator manufacturers use solder that his high in tin. After learning that a scrap yard had a metal analyzer (I think it is called an XVR analyzer) my typical sample came to nearly 40 percent tin.

After 2 years now, I probably used around 10 lbs.

Edited by LARGECALIBERMAN on December 28 2010 at 2:24pm


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mold maker
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Posted: January 23 2011 at 10:20am | IP Logged Quote mold maker

Roto Metals has tin in several forms. It isn't cheap, but neither is gas burned to hunt it.

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