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smokey447
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Posted: February 07 2017 at 5:34pm | IP Logged Quote smokey447

OK.....I'm re-loading for the AR15 type rifle....ordering some FMJ Match Grade boat-tails.... regarding the diameter to order from the catalog, is the correct diameter ".223" or ".224"? They list both . Other than .001" whats the difference between the two???? Can I use either or is one a taboo? My barrel has a 1 in 7 twist.
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richhodg66
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Posted: February 07 2017 at 7:35pm | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

You need .224. All modern .22 centerfires are .224 diameter. The only thing I know that used .223 diameter bullets are pre-WWII .22 Hornets.

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RT58
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Posted: February 08 2017 at 7:34am | IP Logged Quote RT58

I believe the .22 Jet takes .223 dia. also.

But anyway, Flat based bullets bases will expand to fill the bore with no problem, but boat-tails don't, so you might get a little less pressure and velocity. The noses won't expand either and could cause a noticeable loss of accuracy by yawing. I'm sure the guys at our local range wouldn't notice, but if your looking for match grade accuracy stick with the .224s. The fast twist of your barrel is intended for heavier bullets so again, if you are looking for match accuracy make sure the bullets you are buying are intended for that rate of twist.
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smokey447
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Posted: February 08 2017 at 12:44pm | IP Logged Quote smokey447

OK....thanks Guys! .224 it is!
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joed
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Posted: February 09 2017 at 6:53am | IP Logged Quote joed

For good accuracy it's important that you match the weight of the bullets to
the twist.    My AR has a 1:7 twist and shoots 55 gr bullets mediocre.   So far
the lightest bullets I've found that give good accuracy in my gun are 69 gr.

Some with fast twists have said they still get good accuracy with light bullets,
my observations haven't shown that.   One 5.56 rifle I owned with a 1:9 twist
wouldn't shoot 50 or 55 gr with great accuracy either.   

You'll have to see how it handles different bullets to see what it likes.

      



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yissnakk
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Posted: March 01 2017 at 10:36am | IP Logged Quote yissnakk

The twist is important to note, but not overly crucial
unless you are firing bullet weights in the extreme
ends of the spectrum - very light (<50gn) or very
heavy (>72gn). The standard twist rates 1/9 or 1/7
will handle the in-between weights pretty well, but
the rule of thumb is the faster the twist (1/7) for
heavier bullet stabilization and a slower twist (1/9)
for lighter bullets. If you went for the most commonly
available 55gn bullets, then a 1/9 or 1/8 twist would
be preferable over a 1/7 but depending on what kind of
accuracy you are looking for and at what distance (and
several hundred other factors ) it shouldn't be
that big a deal.
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Buffalogun
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Posted: March 03 2017 at 5:13pm | IP Logged Quote Buffalogun

Smokey,

As a friendly reminder.....bullet weight has nothing to do with stabilization with respect to twist rate!

Stabilization is a result of the twist rate and the proper bullet "length". Round nosed flat based bullets and spitzer boat tailed bullets of the same caliber and weight are not the same length.

Some round nosed flat based bullets will shoot accurately with a given twist rate, whereas a spitzer boat tail of the same caliber and weight will be too long for proper stabilization with that same twist rate.


Mike

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fltbed
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Posted: March 05 2017 at 5:53am | IP Logged Quote fltbed

I have a few AR's with 1-9, 1-8 and 1-7 twists. The only boat tail bullets I've had good accuracy with in all three twist rates are the Hornady 75 gr BTHP match. Giving me just under 1 MOA in all my AR's and even my Savage Axis 223.

I use 55 gr FMJ/BT for plinking and short range match use but everything I've tried from Xtreme to Hornady to "pulled" bullets will only group around 1.5"-2" at 100 yards.

However, just like RT58 stated, switch to flat base bullets and I'm back to at least 1 MOA in all of them. Even my 16", (really a 14.5" with a flash hider welded on) chrome lined, "Mil-Spec", 1-7 twist. My favorite are the Hornady 55 gr SP bulk.

Jeff

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yissnakk
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Posted: March 06 2017 at 6:14am | IP Logged Quote yissnakk

Buffalogun wrote:
Smokey,

As a friendly reminder.....bullet weight has nothing
to do with stabilization with respect to twist rate!

Stabilization is a result of the twist rate and the
proper bullet "length". Round nosed flat based bullets
and spitzer boat tailed bullets of the same caliber
and weight are not the same length.

Some round nosed flat based bullets will shoot
accurately with a given twist rate, whereas a spitzer
boat tail of the same caliber and weight will be too
long for proper stabilization with that same twist
rate.

Mike


Very true, but they unfortunately don't sell bullets
by length .

Best gauge available is the weight, and since most
.224 bullets (most, mind you) are boat tailed fmj's
with a conical tip, this only allows a little bit of a
small bullet to come in contact with the rifling
regardless of which bullet type you get (spire point,
ballistic tipped, hollow...) so the best estimate on
how the twist will impact the spin of a particular
bullet is weight, but very good to keep in mind for
those alternative types of bullet (such as cast or
pulled bullets where the dimensions may be different)
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RT58
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Posted: March 07 2017 at 1:00pm | IP Logged Quote RT58

As long as the bullet spins at the rate of twist, the amount of contact makes no difference.

The generic rate of twist charts you see based on weight are only a wild guess and will usually err on the side of over-stabilization. Rate of twist varies on the specific gravity of the projectile and the length, as Buffalogun stated, and some formulas also factor in velocity. The generic charts use a basic specific gravity for jacketed bullets and an estimate of length based on the weight of the most popular style of bullets used. If you want to fine tune your 'rifling to bullet', or 'bullet to rifling', you would need to know the specific gravity and length of the intended bullets.

But for the majority of people that only care about 'close enough', just use the charts.
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