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hoghunter
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Posted: October 20 2017 at 6:50pm | IP Logged Quote hoghunter

dahlin wrote:
We just bought a Ruger American predator
223 this rifle shoots great the price was also very nice.


How's the trigger on it? The one I handled at the range had
a lot of creep and the pull was well over 3 lbs. Maybe just
an isolated case.
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dahlin
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Posted: October 21 2017 at 6:49am | IP Logged Quote dahlin

Ours at least 3# but I would not want less as for creep it doesn't feel like a lot Savage is good that's what I had intended to buy also had interest in Mossberg Patriot. Cant beat the price. Randy
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rednekpaul
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Posted: October 27 2017 at 5:15pm | IP Logged Quote rednekpaul

Maybe the younger generation doesn`t appreciate nice wood. I own few of these plastic stocked rifles. A .308 Axis, Stevens 200 .22-250, Winchester Black shadow .270 which was the low end Winchester 20 years ago. You could put the plastic stocked Weatherby Vanguards in this class. These rifles are cheap, functional and accurate. I`m sure the custom Gunsmiths cringe when they see they see what these "cheap" guns are capable of. What else do you need in a rifle, I like them.
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Old Ranger
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Posted: October 27 2017 at 5:36pm | IP Logged Quote Old Ranger

Rifle manufacturers have been producing rifles capable of MOA shooting for decades. This is nothing new. Been doing this for ages. Just many folks are brainwashed into thinking only a high dollar rifle can shoot tight groups. Sadly, the budget rifles are ignored by most people who blindly follow the idea they must have a fancy weapon for the job. Oh well...

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joed
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Posted: October 27 2017 at 5:40pm | IP Logged Quote joed

I think it's the plastic stocks that help the accuracy. Every wood
stocked rifle I own (except the featherweight) needed some type of
bedding work.    The first synthetic stocked rifle I bought amazed me
with how accurate it was.



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STCM(SW)
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Posted: October 27 2017 at 9:26pm | IP Logged Quote STCM(SW)

My Stevens Salvage I changed from a plastic stock to wood.
It still shoots better than the Remington 700 CDL 25-06 with higher MV and groups.
Strange....

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RT58
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 8:02am | IP Logged Quote RT58

How do they make these rifles so affordable? Unless they've found a way to make a profit by selling their products for less than it costs to build them, they've cut some corners.

Usually manual labor is the first thing to go, first skilled then unskilled. Then they go after the quality of the parts, machining is replaced by castings, then by plastic or zinc. There was a time when this was the difference between the expensive and the budget firearms but anymore it seems they are all made this way.
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joed
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 9:55am | IP Logged Quote joed

RT58 wrote:
How do they make these rifles so affordable?
Unless they've found a way to make a profit by selling their products
for less than it costs to build them, they've cut some corners.

Usually manual labor is the first thing to go, first skilled then
unskilled. Then they go after the quality of the parts, machining is
replaced by castings, then by plastic or zinc. There was a time when
this was the difference between the expensive and the budget
firearms but anymore it seems they are all made this way.


That's what bothers me too.   I'm wondering if these guns are
disposable.   They've cut corners somewhere.   

I wonder what would happen if something went wrong and you had
to take one to a gunsmith.

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Old Ranger
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 11:17am | IP Logged Quote Old Ranger

They're not cheap disposable junk. I worked on weapons for 3 decades in my private gunsmith/dealer business and the PD armory. Guns are guns. They all operate the same per design. Makes no difference to a gunsmith as to repairs. Not trying to be rude, but y'all are worrying about nothing. Simply because a weapon doesn't have expensive machine work and a fancy carved stock won't keep it from being an accurate and reliable firearm. Would a company that makes poorly designed weapons that performed like crap stay in business? Savage doesn't build trash guns. If it did they would be shut down by now. The public wants an affordable firearm built to a utility level void of all the expensive parts and costly process eliminated. They have spoken and the manufacturers responded. It's that simple. Mike's new rifle will be a fine shooting weapon for ages. A wooden stock instead of the composite stock will not change that either.

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rednekpaul
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 2:06pm | IP Logged Quote rednekpaul

And if you shoot the barrel out just toss it and buy a new one
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Old Ranger
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 2:49pm | IP Logged Quote Old Ranger

Anyone here actually shot so much that they litterly wore out the bore of their rifle? Not counting extreme hot ball powder scorching the lead on the chamber's entrance of one .22-250 by a guy who overloaded anyway, I haven't. Unless abused badly, all our weapons will well outlast us all.

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joed
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 4:55pm | IP Logged Quote joed

I wore out the barrel on my 700 VS in .25-06 a few years ago. Lasted
about 30 years before it started to get fliers. It's a badly overbore
cartridge but I wouldn't trade it.     I had it replaced with a Krieger,   
best move I ever made.   It will shoot as good as the Stealth but a
cold bore shot will be off a bit.

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joed
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Posted: October 28 2017 at 9:03pm | IP Logged Quote joed

Old Ranger wrote:
They're not cheap disposable junk.


I'm glad to hear that.   When I heard how good the rifle shot I was
impressed.   You hear a little about the Axis but not much. Maybe
we'll start seeing more reports on these budget rifles.

Do like the price he paid for the performance he got.   

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Old Ranger
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 7:28am | IP Logged Quote Old Ranger

Joe, I have a 2009 Marlin XLR7C made at the old Marlin plant, that was $400 out the door. Chambered in .30'06Spr with a fine camo composite stock. With either jacketed or cast rounds, this rifle will, with the correct load, shoot tight groups that are always sub-MOA at 100yds off the bipod. Other than the bipod and padded cheekpiece, it's box stock. I've done nothing to the action or how it's mounted to the stock. It shoots every bit as good or better than the 1955 mfg Winchester Model 70 I once had. Just as good or better....

The Marlin is the only boltgun I own. I intend to buy a.243Win in the future and it will be a Savage Axis. After extensive research and comparative analysis of the available firearms produced today, the Axis is, in my opinion, the best "bang for the buck" around. Whether the scope it has is good or not is relative. Scopes are an easy change out if it conks out.

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Buffalogun
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 7:30am | IP Logged Quote Buffalogun

To start...

Savage has used the 10/110 action and barrels for many years and the Axis uses the same small shank barrels as the 10/110 series. No new barrel tooling would be necessary for the Axis. Tooling costs saved!

The Axis action is a little different from their other bolt actions in that it has a closed top. So, less metal has to be milled away than normal. Less milling time saves on labor and tooling costs. In actuality, the closed top may strengthen the action.

The stock is injection molded and saves a lot of costs associated with inletting a wooden stock. Laminated wooden stocks from Boyd's run around $150. Walnut would undoubtedly cost a lot more.

The plastic stock is lightweight, but not noisy. The action is held in place by two bedding pillars so as to not cause the stock to collapse under tension from the action screws. It works very well. There are sling studs in place, too.

The trigger guard is also injection molded, but is plenty rigid. The bottom plate of the detachable magazine is also molded. More milling costs saved.

The scope mounts are Weaver style, made of steel, but the rings are aluminum. And, it works very well.

Apparently, Savage long ago mastered the art of button rifling their barrels. This one does shoot very well.

As far as having to take it to a smith, the action is very simple and many folks do their own repairs/customization. Aftermarket replaceable parts are available.

As a whole, the rifle isn't pretty to look at, but it can be "dressed up" if the owner so desires. If not, it is a good serviceable hunting rifle just as it comes from the factory.

And, the availability of owner changed barrels and bolt heads allows for a near limitless variety of chamberings. The Axis comes in one action size which is suitable for the '06 case size. More milling costs saved!

No, it isn't a disposable. In fact it is a platform on which the owner can build a nice rifle to his liking.



Mike

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RT58
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 7:49am | IP Logged Quote RT58

Ranger, I wasn't worried. For one thing I've got all the firearms I'll ever own. But when I do go to a gun store to drool at something I don't have, I go straight to the used racks.

Manufacturers have offered less "frilly" arms for many years, as I'm sure you know. Not everyone wants a high polished, deep blued rifle with a nice walnut stock and would just as soon save some money to boot. But the bottom line is still "you don't get something for nothing" and they cut the costs somewhere. When I sold firearms at the hardware store we ordered a "new and improved" Savage varmint rifle. It was parkerized, had a hardwood stock with a walnut finish and actually looked good, in it's own way. When you worked the bolt it felt like it was riding on sandpaper and sat on the shelf for many years before someone bought it. I think the first thing most companies cut is the QC inspector. I'm not saying Savage is worse than anyone else, that's the direction the industry went, and yes, it was due in part to customer demand.

There are some parts of a rifle that can be made cheaper and some that are better off being made of higher quality. Sure a gunsmith can fix it, and probably make it better, but that makes the end price go up. If they aren't disposable now they will be eventually because that is what we've become. If you buy a cell phone and there is a problem with it you take it back. Do they fix it? Nope, they throw it in a trash bin and give you another one. The labor costs involved in salvaging the parts is greater than the cost of the parts to start with. Same thing with a TV set. The cost of paying a repairman is more than a new set. Eventually the same thing will happen with firearms, if it hasn't already started. Paying a gunsmith to buy a new part and repair a damaged firearm will cost more than buying a new one.
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Old Ranger
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 8:16am | IP Logged Quote Old Ranger

I'll have to remember that method if I have a flat tire in the future. I'll scrap the car rather than have the flat repaired.

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Paul B.
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 3:20pm | IP Logged Quote Paul B.

Well I guess I must be a rifle snob. My preference would be for a well
tuned Mauser action and nice walnut. You can find them but the price is
going up. Cruise the gun shows for a J.C. Higgins M50. If the guy know
what he has it won't be cheap. I used to pick them up for $200 to $250
depending on condition. Now $400+ and as much as $550 for a really
clean specimen. I bought a few as they're perfect for making custom
rifles.
Problem is these "cheap" rifles that are now on the market make selling
"real" rifles difficult. Yeah, I'm a rifle snob and proud of it.
Paul B.
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joed
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 3:51pm | IP Logged Quote joed

Last night I went to the Savage site and looked up the Axis.   From
what I saw it looks like a very good rifle.   What Mike pointed out
about the action not being open at the top does sound like a good
idea adding strength.   The stock I would have to see.

The best Savage I owned was a 10FP in .223, with a flimsy stock that
touched the barrel if you rested it on something it was capable of
some amazing accuracy.   I actually regret selling that rifle. Only
reason I sold it was it would not shoot 50 or 55 gr bullets with
accuracy that I wanted.   The 69 gr bullets on the other hand would
leave a ragged hole at 100 yards.   

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joed
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Posted: October 29 2017 at 3:56pm | IP Logged Quote joed

Paul B. wrote:

Problem is these "cheap" rifles that are now on the market make
selling
"real" rifles difficult. Yeah, I'm a rifle snob and proud of it.
Paul B.


This is what has me concerned too.   Most of my riles are higher
end, not custom but well made with walnut or nice after market
synthetic stocks.

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