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John Van Gelder
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Posted: May 09 2018 at 9:01am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

Guy

Not sure if I would take my .30-06, I have taken a lot of wild pigs, with my 70# recurve bow in the Northern Territory of Australia.

If I had to choose a rifle, I would be more inclined to use my 94 Winchester, .45 Colt with 340 grn. bullets..

The air gun would be pretty far down on my list.

I think as Pete suggested that this is a stunt. No idea of how many pigs were shot before the successful ones in the video.
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Ham Gunner
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Posted: May 09 2018 at 1:39pm | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

Even with squirrels at fairly close range a .177 cal. pellet rifle is not always a clean kill unless smacked squarely in the noggin. I first was only getting about 75% kills in my yard with open sights. The other 25% normally made it all the way up the trees and spiked other trees crossing into my neighbors yards before they conked out and fell out of the trees.

I thought about getting high quality peep sights, but ended up with a pellet rifle scope. A decent pellet rifle scope (not a high powered rifle scope) was certainly a much better set up for me. With parallax adjustable as close as up to 7 1/2 yards, I increased my kill ratio to near 100%. Most high powered rifle scopes have either a set parallax at somewhere around 75 Yds. or adjustable that will not adjust closer than about 25 yds. With shots closer than that, the error in where the crosshairs actually appear to the shooters eye, is enough to miss the center of a squirrels head even up close.

Although only a fairly cheap scope, I bought a BSA 1" tube 2-7 x 32mm scope with adjustable objective and I am very happy with it and it is reinforced for the reverse recoil of a spring gun. It is clear and after changing adjustments for elevation, it accurately comes back to zero ever time. I have also used it on .22 rifles and feel that a decent quality pellet rifle scope is a better match for a .22 rifle. Even while squirrel hunting with a .22 rifle, there are numerous times where the yardage of the shots can suddenly be very close and a high powered rifle scope is just not accurate enough at close range due to the limitation in their parallax adjustment as well as focus to be as useful.

Edited by Ham Gunner on May 09 2018 at 1:48pm


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John Van Gelder
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Posted: May 09 2018 at 5:33pm | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

Ham Gunner

Even with just squirrels and rabbits, "surgical" shot placement is required. Back in the days when I lived on the dairy farm in up state New York, and there was a real surplus of squirrels to be had, hunting them with the air gun was a real challenge.

Back in the early 60s the best option was the Crosman pneumatic, pumped up to at least 10 pumps. Those guns had a relief, so 10 pumps was all you could get. The earlier gun did not have the relief function, and you could pump them up so hard that they would not fire. They were "air locked", my older brother had a solution, he used rummer bands made from inner tubes to give the firing spring more speed. Those old guns had an external "hammer". He would load the gun with bullets pulled from .22LR, under 25 yards he had not trouble killing wood chucks.

I went the other way myself, I had one of the early Crosman pistols that used the CO2 cylinders, my gun was a .22. I made some wad cutters from steel machine screws, wrapped them with adhesive tape, to get a good seal and keep the steel off my rifling. They were light, probably comparable to todays alloy pellets.

I would go out and lie down next to a wood chuck hole, they are a sort of ramp and the wood chuck can come out only one way. I was above and behind the chuck. When they came out I had a clear shot at the back of their heads. Those steel wad cutters were instant death at 3' or less. There was a lot of patience there waiting for the chuck to appear, there was probably a opportunity for me as a sniper.. :)
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Pete D.
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Posted: May 09 2018 at 6:40pm | IP Logged Quote Pete D.

Quote:
I made some wad cutters from steel machine screws, wrapped
them with adhesive tape, to get a good seal and keep the steel off my
rifling. They were light, probably comparable to todays

Vrry clever. I shall have to try that

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John Van Gelder
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Posted: May 10 2018 at 11:38am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

Pete

Air guns are a lot of fun, and the best part is that they are economical fun.. There are lots of things you can try, it you elect to make some of the machine screw pellets , just for fun try grinding a point on the end. The ones I did were just cylinders.

In the big bore air guns, I think that the best value for the dollar is the Benjamin Rogue, .357. My dad after he retired from farming went to work for Crosman, there may be a bit of bias there.

I think that everyone who likes shooting should have a/some airguns because we may be headed into another crunch, where ammo and components are hard to find.

The standard .45 Colt loading, 255 gr, bullet at 8-900 fps. Will work for anything in North America. Any of the big bore airguns that can duplicate that performance should be just fine.

For small game a good .22cal. air gun is hard to beat. The best of both worlds are the self contained PCP guns.

Here is just one of them.. Self Contained PCP
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Pete D.
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Posted: May 11 2018 at 3:25am | IP Logged Quote Pete D.

Quote:

Back in the early 60s the best option was the Crosman pneumatic,
pumped up to at least 10 pumps. Those guns had a relief, so 10 pumps
was all you could get. The earlier gun......

Yep, i had one, a .22, that i used for rabbits....18-20 pumps and it
anchored a rabbit at 25 yards or so with one shot.
Pete


Edited by Pete D. on May 11 2018 at 3:35am


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John Van Gelder
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Posted: May 11 2018 at 6:49am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

Pete

Good guns, it seems like they have limited the upper velocity of the new guns. The new .22s are listed at just over 600 fps. max. Almost any of the spring guns will do better than that.

Probably the most accurate of the kind of gun is the The Webley Rebel. Which unlike the current Benjamin guns is pretty easy to scope.

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Pete D.
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Posted: May 12 2018 at 4:25am | IP Logged Quote Pete D.

I had a Webley Tempest. It had the worst trigger of any air pistol i have
owned. Too bad because it was a compact and cool looking gun.


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John Van Gelder
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Posted: May 12 2018 at 6:15am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

A good pump air pistol is a handy item, and the very essence of hand loading. One pump and you are ready for mice in the house, from there on up for various pests around the house and even some small game hunting at close ranges.

I had a very old Crosman pneumatic pistol in .22. I had a"blind" in one of our barns, with a good view of one of the big bushes that the English sparrows frequented, my father paid a bounty on sparrows, starlings and pidgins. Two pumps of the old Crosman was adequate for a sparrow from my blind.

I would work the barns at night with a big flashlight and the air gun, I made enough to keep me in ammunition.
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