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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 03 2018 at 11:27am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

The SP 101, is very easy to work on, the gun can be pretty well dissembled with no tools. The one in question sounds like a bit of foreign material in the action.

I have owned seven different Ruger DA revolvers, they all worked well, five of the six I have qualified with as carry/back up duty weapons. The the other two were Redhawk, .44 and .45s.



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RT58
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Posted: July 03 2018 at 11:29am | IP Logged Quote RT58

My problems with Rugers weren't just with mine, but the ones I sold as a dealer and with the company its self.

Some of my issues were personal, such as balance and feel. Some issues other owners may have overlooked, such as poor fit and finish. Poor accuracy was pretty common, maybe my expectations were too high, but if other gun makers can do it why can't they? The company seemed to place profit over customer satisfaction.

While dealing in the 80's the gun industry took a serious downturn in business. Ruger mailed a copy of an article from a business magazine about how gun companies were dealing with the loss of business. Marlin said they were getting into the electronics industry to help make up for the loss in gun sales, which sounded pretty smart to me. Ruger said they were eliminating the inefficient labor intensive processes of gun manufacturing, imposing larger price increases and investing more money in advertising. Which apparently meant making the gun cheaper, jacking up their prices and paying gun writers more to tell everyone how great they were. We shipped so many new guns back we couldn't make a profit so I quit selling them.

I had one guy that wanted a Blackhawk because a magazine article said how great they were and if I wouldn't order him one he'd go somewhere else. I told him about the problems they were having and if he wanted one that bad to go ahead and buy it elsewhere. A couple weeks later he came in with his new Blackhawk and asked me if he could trade it in on something else. The front sight was turned about 45 degrees too far to the right and I told him I didn't want it. Then he asked if I'd send it back to Ruger to have it fixed and I suggested he take it back to where he bought it. Another few weeks later he came back with it. The dealer he bought it from claimed he sent it back and Ruger did the repair, which was a washer inserted between the barrel and frame and cold blued. He shot it once and the barrel came loose. I told him I doubted Ruger did the fix, the dealer probably was tired of sending guns back too.

It used to be good guns cost more for a reason, now it seems there are no good guns left as consumers are willing to pay more money for garbage.
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 03 2018 at 11:47am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

No matter what you deal with there are things that slip through the cracks.

I have a Blackhawk that I have been shooting for the past 40 years, it has been reliable and accurate.

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Ham Gunner
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Posted: July 03 2018 at 2:22pm | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

I have had a few Rugers over the years. The only one that I traded off, I regretted, but I have not gotten anything in the last 15 years for so. The newer Rugers are likely short on labor from what all I have read which is not good no matter what brand or type of weapon.

Started of with a 6 1/2" flat top three screw .44 mag. Blackhawk that I bought used in 1973 for $115 which included a Bianchi holster. Still have it and always will.

Next was a used 6 1/2" non-flat top three screw Blackhawk in .357 mag. It drove tacks with cast loads. I messed up and traded it off.

Got a used P-90 in .45 ACP. Never a problem with it. Gave it to my son and he still has it.

A 3" GP-100 in .357 mag. Great revolver though a bit heavy to pack. Gave it to my son and he still has it as well.

A 2 1/2" SP-101 in .357 mag. No problems with it, but it never has been all that accurate. Likely a cylinder throat reaming and some honing to reduce restriction at the frame would help it a good bit. It also has a fairly rough bore.

We used P-89 9mm at the prison for the last 20 or so years that I was there and they were tough as nails, but the triggers on the DAO were not helpful to achieve great accuracy for many. They stood up to hundreds of thousands of rounds. Had a few problems along the way, but not really much to complain about as they were shot a whole bunch.

Now the newer models are another story. My buddy has a new model SBH in .44 mag. and it needed cylinder throat reaming and he is still honing the bore restriction. After 60 rounds of 220 grit the restriction is getting less, but he likely has more to go before he can finish it up with super fine grit for polishing.

I have several Ruger rifles and all have rough bores that I had to hone a bit before they stopped fouling really badly. Trigger jobs are always a must it seemed as well. Certainly tough weapons, but not refined in production.   

Edited by Ham Gunner on July 03 2018 at 2:41pm


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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 04 2018 at 5:36am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

My three newest Rugers are my flat top .44. I have been well pleased with that gun, the inside of the barrel is just like a mirror. The timing is correct and it is a fun long range shooter.

My 9E had some leading issues, which I found was due to a rough barrel, I sent it back, and eight days later it was returned with a new barrel, a great shooter ever since.

The other is an American .45ACP, that one is a real "tank", the trigger is better on the American than the SR series, the whole design is more robust. I have some plinking loads, and have no problem picking ground squirrels off at 25 yards.

For those of us who have spent most of their shooting lives, with single action autos or shooting DA revolvers single action, the striker fired guns have a learning curve. But once you have the trigger mastered they will shoot as good as anything else.

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RB in GA
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Posted: July 05 2018 at 7:54pm | IP Logged Quote RB in GA

Sounds like fired primers backing out and tying up the cylinder. Had a Taurus 85 that was really tight between the recoil shield and the cylinder face. Fired cases would sometime tie up the cylinder from advancing.
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M700
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Posted: July 05 2018 at 8:29pm | IP Logged Quote M700

RB in GA wrote:
Sounds like fired primers backing out and tying up the cylinder. Had a Taurus 85 that was really tight between the recoil shield and the cylinder face. Fired cases would sometime tie up the cylinder from advancing.


Nope. Locked up on an empty cylinder too.

Gun problem. I haven't heard yet what she did about it.

Guy
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M700
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Posted: July 05 2018 at 8:31pm | IP Logged Quote M700

If I hear back from her about the final resolution, I'll let ya know.

I've had very few problems with Rugers over the years. This disappointed me.

Guy
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 06 2018 at 5:33am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

Back when I was in the service I had a little gun smithing business on the side. A lady brought in a gun to have me look at it, a pretty nice fairly expensive double barrel shot gun.

It had been her husbands gun, and she wanted to sell it, but could not because no one could get the action open. I looked the gun over and noticed that it was a bit sticky to the touch, not too unusual a lot of old guns when the finish starts to break down can feel that way.

I asked her if she had lubricated the gun before storing it. She said that she had, she put oil on the out side and even poured some down the barrels.

My next question was what kind of oil..she replied Wessen Oil..
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turbo1889
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Posted: July 06 2018 at 6:00am | IP Logged Quote turbo1889

John Van Gelder wrote:
. . . My next
question was what kind of oil..she replied
Wessen Oil..


I've heard of that happening. Cooking oil
and mechanical things don't mix well.
Cooking oil will dry to a sticky gunk with
glue like tendencies over time as I'm sure
you are aware.

I do think though it does take quite
awhile to crust up. This problem
Remington revolver was just recently
bought new right?

Edited by turbo1889 on July 06 2018 at 6:02am


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John P.
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Posted: July 06 2018 at 8:05pm | IP Logged Quote John P.

Rugers are decent firearms; although, like many manufacturers, tend to
require some tweaking.

My first .44 Magnum was a used new model SBH that I bought in 1986.
The Ruger shot terrible, so I traded it for something else. I am sure tight
cylinder throats were the problem. I picked up another SBH with a 4 5/8
inch barrel. This one shoots great especially with cast lead bullets.

My latest Ruger is their Redhawk in .45 Colt/.45 ACP that I picked up a
few weeks ago. So far so good with this one. I shot a bunch of mixed
factory .45 ACP that were given to me. I did get some light hits on
double action with a box of very old Remington 230 grain FMJ. I
suspect there was an issue with the moonclips and the rim thickness on
the old brass. Everything else shot fine. Last weekend I ran my favorite
.45 Colt load in the Ruger - 9 grains Unique and a 255 gr. cast RNFP.
The Redhawk shot good. I was able to keep everything tight and well
centered in paper plates at 15 yards while shooting two hands standing
both DA and SA. Not a huge feat, but it gives me a general idea that
the Ruger shoots good. Hopefully if I get the time, I will work with the
Redhawk a little more this weekend.

Edited by John P. on July 06 2018 at 8:08pm
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 07 2018 at 5:39am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

I think that the ability to shoot .45Colt/ACP in the same gun/cylinder is one of the better ideas Ruger had.

I have never had a problem with my Redhawk, the single action trigger leaves something to desire, but with some practice one gets used to it. My favorite 45 Colt load is also the 255 grn RNFP over 9 gr of unique.

There are other means of shooting rimless cartridges in revolvers. I do not recall the make of the gun, and it is out of "print" now. It was a .367 magnum, that would shoot any of the .35 cal auto cartridges. It utilized a sort of spring and detent mechanism incorporated into the extractor. No moon clips required.

I fiddled around with my Redhawk, by experimenting with different sized "O" rings found some that when placed in the extractor groove of the case, would hold the round in place for reliable ignition and extraction.     
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REM1875
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Posted: July 07 2018 at 6:10pm | IP Logged Quote REM1875

John
Would you be talking about the Phillip and Rodgers
'Medusa' ???
Yes It shoots most 38/357/9mm rounds and damned well.
Obsolete and new. The list is long .....

Will not shoot the 9 Mak and 38 S&W due to bullet
diameters and 380s are not worth the hassle with spilt
and swollen casings

Unlike the extractor on the Charter Arms rimless
cartridge revolvers the extractor on the Medusa is weak.
Too bad the two had not been combined.

I spent more than a few pleasant hours at the factory in
Conroe, Tx before it closed .....

Edited by REM1875 on July 07 2018 at 6:12pm
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REM1875
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Posted: July 08 2018 at 2:25am | IP Logged Quote REM1875

Ok
I am a Ruger fan.
I am Happy with my Ruger RedHawk in 10 mm. I am happy
with all my revolvers from the Old Army to the GP 100 -
327 Fed Mag and all in between.....

but they do make some mistakes.....The M 77/357 needed
work right out of the box ....I had to stone the chamber
to get extraction....the chamber area looked rougher than
my war time manufactured Mosin-Nagants.. does it function
and shoot now ...yes .....but so do the Mosins....am I
happy with it now ??? reasonable so ........But Ruger
ain't perfect ... And Marlin .....
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 08 2018 at 5:36am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

REM1875

Nothing is perfect and even if it was we would still find the need to "make it better"..just human nature.

I do believe that the Medusa was the gun I was thinking of, I saw one in a store in Goldendale Wa., it looked pretty neat, but the price tag was pretty neat too..
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Buffalogun
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Posted: July 08 2018 at 7:13pm | IP Logged Quote Buffalogun

I have had Ruger SA's down through the years and have never needed to send one back for any reason.

They have shot plenty accurate for their intended purposes and some have shot very well. Anytime I buy a fixed sight gun I expect to have to adjust point of aim by turning the barrel and filing down the front sight.

I have honed out the cylinder throats on one Vaquero .45 Colt. Not difficult and was a learning experience.

Now.....if I had paid BIG money for a Colt Python and found it out of time, I'd be WARPED!

Many moons ago I had a Ruger Security Six 6" .357 Mag. and I shot a few squirrels with that revolver. It was accurate.

After the Ruger was stolen, I replaced it with a S&W 586 6". In spite of trying different brands and bullet weights of factory ammo I never could get that paper weight to shoot. I couldn't hit the ground with it.

It went down the road! I've been with Ruger ever since.


Mike

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REM1875
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Posted: July 08 2018 at 7:57pm | IP Logged Quote REM1875

John
one of my favorite rounds out of the Medusa is the 9mm
Mag ....Winchester couldn't even tell me how they loaded
em 20 years ago....
I manufactured a bunch of the odd ball 9mm as close as I
could (that was before I found out COTW was not a
reference to be used for loads) ....it ate them all ....

Except one would eat 9x23 and one would not ... no matter
what the factory tried ......

And they are accurate ........


They also made us a custom 5 shot 50 AE on a
BlackHawk.... the most miserable gun I have ever shot ..
bar none ....
Being a revolver we could shoot cast and we had a 460 gr
mold made for it ......over an ounce of lead is a damned
handful ......



Edited by REM1875 on July 08 2018 at 8:07pm
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 13 2018 at 9:38am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

REM1875

Once upon a time I really liked those large diameter, hard kicking hand guns. Not so much anymore, must be getting old.

I used to shoot 350 grn bullets in my Blackhawk 45 when I lived in Alaska. They shot nicely, and I did not mind the recoil. I also had a session with the TC single shot pistols, with several different barrels. I had a ,45Colt bull barrel, and loaded up some sized down 450 grn .45-70 bullets, that was a bit of a hand full.

Back when I had my private investigator business, one of the attorneys I worked for, went out and bought a .500 S&W, kind of a celebration after a very long homicide trial. I was surprised at how easy those guns were to shoot, the one he bought had the long barrel and a compensator.

A friend of ours, and our DNA expert, a little Hispanic lady, that weighed about 110#, stepped up and wanted a turn with the .500. I have a picture of the gun in recoil, her going backward with the gun pointed nearly straight up.
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REM1875
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Posted: July 13 2018 at 10:06am | IP Logged Quote REM1875

John
I fired 45-70 bullets of all sorts from my Ruger Old Army
after sizing the base down to 452-4
The 500    and 560 grain just would not fit ....
The heavier the bullet the bigger the recoil ... as we all
know .
I am not shooting anything much past 405 in the BFR....
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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 13 2018 at 10:34am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

These days the heavy bullet I shoot in my .45s is the RCBS 270SAA, around 290 gr, in my alloy.

A very accurate bullet.
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