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richhodg66
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Posted: July 16 2018 at 11:38am | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

Been seeing a lot of deer the past few days. Our season will start in mid September with Archery and Muzzle Loader. Archery will run through the end of the year, muzzle loader is two weeks.

I'm starting to get stoked about it. Most years, I kill two, occasionally I've killed three, and now and then only get one, but I have the area and technique down well enough now that if I can put in a few weekend days over the course of the Fall and early Winter, I'm pretty assured of filling the freezer.

Venison is pretty much the only red meat we keep in the house. I usually butcher the ones I shoot myself. Most people seem to like making sausage, beer sticks, etc., with venison, I don't. I grind a lot of it and keep it pure. I also cut a lot as stew meat because venison stew is about as good as food gets to me. Back straps get cut into cubed steaks. This year I broke down the hind quarters of the buck I shot into roasts and have been having better luck cooking them as pot roasts than I have had in the past.

I'm about to start cooking one of my favorites, always turns out good and is so simple it's almost embarrassing. I take some loin steaks, pound them with a meat mallet, dip them in flour that's been salted and peppered, brown them in olive oil then crock pot them in a mix of one can of cream of mush room soup and a can of French Onion soup with an 8 ounce can of the spicy V-8 juice. Cook until it's fork tender and then eat with long grain rice. Great stuff.

What are some of you guy's standard recipes? We do a lot of chili, meat loaf, etc., over the course of the year, it doesn't very often get fancy, but I'm usually looking for ideas.

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LAH
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Posted: July 16 2018 at 11:50am | IP Logged Quote LAH

Quote:
I also cut a lot as stew meat because venison stew
is about as good as food gets to me.


That's me. Some years it's all stew meat but the back
straps.

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richhodg66
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Posted: July 16 2018 at 12:14pm | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

Best chili recipe I've tried to date, but it's more trouble than I usually go to, plus, my wife doesn't like spicy stuff and this is usually too much for her.


Field and Stream Editor's Venison Chili Recipe

Makes 12 servings
A spicy chili made with venison. A sure winner in a chili cookoff!

Ingredients

2 lbs venison
1/4 lb bacon, diced
2 medium yellow onions, diced
1 medium red onion, diced
2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and diced
1 red pepper, seeded and diced
1 yellow pepper, seeded and diced
1 green pepper, seeded and diced
2 oz canned chipotle chilis in adobo sauce , seeded and chopped fine
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
4 tbsp chili powder
1 tbsp paprika
1 tbsp cumin
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tbsp cinnamon
1/4 cup honey
1 tbsp molasses
1 pint Guinness or other stout beer
1/2 cup red wine
1 1/2 c whole plum tomatoes , or 1 whole can
350 g crushed tomatoes or 1 whole can
650 g black beans or 2 whole cans
Directions1.In large pan, saute venison until just cooked. Drain and set aside. Cook in batches if necessary to keep from crowding in the pan.

2.In a large pot with a heavy bottom, saute bacon over medium heat until it's brown and has given up its fat. Remove and set aside.

3.Saute onions and peppers in the bacon fat, stirring frequently until soft, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and vinegar and cook for two minutes. Add chili powder, paprika, cumin, salt, pepper, cinnamon and cook, stirring often, for about three minutes. Add venison and bacon. Stir well and cook for one minute.

4.Add honey, molasses, beer, wine and tomatoes. Mix well, bring to a boil, adjust heat to low.

5.Cook at a slow simmer, uncovered, for about an hour and stir frequently. Taste and adjust seasonings, adding more chili powder or chipotle chillies if you want more heat.

6.Add beans and cook for another hour, continuing to stir. The chili is done when it's thick enough to your liking.

7.Garnish with chopped cilantro.


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Ham Gunner
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Posted: July 16 2018 at 12:15pm | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

Tenderloin gets eaten at camp along with some other choice tender parts gathered from all the other camp deer to make up at least one meal at camp.

Backstraps I slice thin or cube to be rolled in seasoned flour to slow fry into tenders. Some large parts of the hams and a bit of other clean meat that does not have to be cleaned up of sinew I use to make jerky that I distribute to my three children for their families to enjoy. I still have teeth, but do not eat much of the jerky these days. I experimented with making jerky with ground meat and I think that will work well injected into about 3/8" diameter strings for the dehydrator. I have found that we all like my home made jerky seasoning better than any that we have tried that was store bought. I use lots of garlic and a bit of brown sugar to make a slightly sweet garlic flavor but not too much pepper with everyone preferring black pepper to the hotter red or cayenne.

The rest I grind up for summer sausage and I like extra garlic, mustard seed, and cracked black pepper as well as plenty of finely chopped Jalapeņo without any seeds. It cooks into the meat leaving the pepper flavor without much heat at all. Occasionally I end up with a few lbs. of ground or small cubed pieces that we save for deer chili. Might just have to try Rich's recipe.

Been awhile since I have saved any roasts, but after reading Rich's post, my mouth was watering to do the creme of mushroom crock pot roast. Hard to beat about any crock pot dinner anyway.

Edited by Ham Gunner on July 16 2018 at 12:18pm


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richhodg66
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Posted: July 16 2018 at 12:46pm | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

This is the roast recipe I used. Found out by accident the second time I made it that if you cook it according to directions, then put it in the fridge overnight and heat it up the next evening it was a lot better, don't know why, but it made a big difference.

http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/stove-top-eye-of-the-rou nd-88187

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Buffalogun
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Posted: July 17 2018 at 12:50pm | IP Logged Quote Buffalogun

While I have no doubt that venison can make fine soups and stews, I usually save the backstrap for frying or poppers.
My favorite burgers whether venison or beef have smoked bacon ground and mixed in with the burger meat. It's much better than laying strips of bacon on the pattie.

The poppers have a half jalapeno pepper, stuffed with a strip of backstrap and wrapped with bacon and then marinated in Crystal hot sauce. Then they are placed over charcoal until the bacon is cooked.


Mike

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Ham Gunner
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Posted: July 18 2018 at 7:41am | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

For any of the ground venison meat, I add about 20% fat to the mix. I normally can get ends and pieces of smoked bacon in 10 lb. boxes fairly inexpensively here locally at my grocery store and it is really not much more than what I would pay for beef fat from the store meat department anyway.

I do the same for any wild pork meat that I grind up as well since it is very lean.

Edited by Ham Gunner on July 18 2018 at 7:42am


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RECURVE
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Posted: July 18 2018 at 4:25pm | IP Logged Quote RECURVE

Rich I'm 72years old buy the time I made that chilli I'd
be dead lol
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M700
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Posted: July 19 2018 at 3:01am | IP Logged Quote M700

More on this later. I do enjoy cooking and serving wild game, particularly venison. Usually keep it pretty simple. Simple & good.

That chili sounds wonderful!

I've had more success in recent years with the roasts. Didn't really do a very good job of cooking them for a while.

Backstrap & tenderloin steaks... Oh my goodness.... Love 'em!

Guy
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richhodg66
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Posted: July 19 2018 at 3:29am | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

The wife and I like to eat at a good Korean place now and then, so I tried some Bulgogi from some venison stew meat and it turned out good, though I think I'll slice it thinner next time.

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Ham Gunner
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Posted: July 19 2018 at 9:06pm | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

Next time you are in the Korean restaurant ask them if they have Gaegogi. I most likely ate some when I was in Korea.


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richhodg66
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Posted: July 20 2018 at 4:15am | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

I'm kind of unusual in that I never was assigned to Korea, most guys who do a career do at least a one year tour. I never set foot on the peninsula until I was about six months out from retiring and went there for three weeks for an exercise. I did see a couple of markets where they had dogs in cages for sale for exactly that. Hard to get our heads around it, but an animal is meat in the final analysis, just don't think I could knowingly eat one unless I had to.

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John Van Gelder
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Posted: July 24 2018 at 6:12am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

If you take care of the animal in the field, get them cleaned out and cooled, there is no such thing as a bad piece of venison.

My favorite recipe, is "mostly cooked"..

Caribou, is however an acquired taste..
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safari100
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Posted: July 24 2018 at 7:39pm | IP Logged Quote safari100

If you like lamb you like caribou


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richhodg66
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Posted: August 07 2018 at 4:00am | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

Tried this one the other day. It turned out good, but I think I slightly prefer the other recipe for roast that I posted. This one was simpler, though.

https://www.thecountrycook.net/crock-pot-mississippi-pot-roa st/


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turbo1889
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Posted: August 07 2018 at 5:31am | IP Logged Quote turbo1889

safari100 wrote:
If you like lamb you
like caribou


Don't you mean mutton instead of lamb? In
my experience good young lamb is very
different then mutton (when you let a lamb
go too long before butchering). Yes most
store bought lamb is false labeling and
should be labeled mutton.

Never eaten a young pre-adolescent caribou
so don't know if they also have a huge
difference in taste if you get them young
enough but I can confirm adult caribou is
a lot like mutton.

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John Van Gelder
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Posted: August 07 2018 at 5:52am | IP Logged Quote John Van Gelder

As with anything, it depends on what the animals have been eating.

Deer that have been feeding in the Alfalfa, or winter wheat are pretty "mild", those that have been feeding mostly on beach nuts and acorns are different again.

Perhaps there is something to the saying "You are what you eat."..
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safari100
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Posted: August 07 2018 at 8:57pm | IP Logged Quote safari100

Never shot a baby caribou and have no idea what a mutton is. I would assume from your post that it is a adult sheep. What ever the case is caribou are damn good eats.

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turbo1889
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Posted: August 08 2018 at 3:29am | IP Logged Quote turbo1889

Mutton = Adult sheep at least a full year
old, fully sexually mature.

Lamb = Sheep less than a year old, barely
sexually mature if sexually mature.

Both the taste and even the smell of the
meat is different, even when raised
together in the same pasture, same feed,
same breeding stock. Once sheep get old
enough to make more baby sheep their meat
changes noticeably to the point where
there are two names (lamb vs. mutton) for
the meat in culinary terms.

Lamb tasts and smells a lot better then
mutton to most people. But mutton isn't
bad if cooked correctly. I've had caribou
and at least what I had I would put with
mutton rather then lamb. I've had elk,
venison, and antelope. They all tasted
better then the caribou I've had. BUT
caribou is better then most bear meat that
I have had for sure.

Edited by turbo1889 on August 08 2018 at 3:32am


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richhodg66
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Posted: August 08 2018 at 3:40am | IP Logged Quote richhodg66

The venison around here is real good. The public land I hunt, is also farmed through some deal between the state and Corps of Engineers, so there's always a lot of soybeans and milo growing early and then Winter wheat late season, needless to say, the deer are pretty fat.

Even people who don't routinely eat venison it's good. I made one of those roasts from the first recipe for a church function covered dish deal the other day and it was gone before I got through the line. Everybody liked it.

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