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M700
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Posted: January 01 2019 at 4:08pm | IP Logged Quote M700

Got the word last night that a family had abandoned their Nissan Armada SUV on a snow covered dirt road over on Badger Mountain, about 25 miles from my place. They'd been out looking at property in it, and had descended to a place where the road was blocked. They'd planned a reasonable route, downhill all the way, but a large fallen tree across the road blocked them. When they tried to drive the SUV back up to where they'd started... It wasn't up to the task.

Ultimately the young couple walked out with their two kids. They noticed some large "dog" tracks along the way... The area is known to have wolf, coyote, mountain lion and bears... Not sure what they saw tracks of, but entirely possible it was some large, furry predator.

The parents hiked back in on Monday, carrying tire chains. They were only able to get one chain on the front, and did make some progress towards getting out, but not enough. Last night our local 4wd community learned of their predicament. This morning four people headed out in three Jeeps to get that Nissan out of there! The couple met us at the end of the pavement and hopped in our Jeeps. I aired down to 10 psi for traction.

We drove down, down, and down some more. I was getting worried about getting my own Jeep out! I would not have gone down there, in winter, except if necessary. I guess this was necessary. We reached the Nissan Armada, and I was relieved to see that it had a pair of front tow hooks from the factory! Yes! I went to work with shovel, and shoved some Max Trax boards in front of the rear tires.


My son spooled out some synthetic winch line from his 1998 Cherokee. Warn 8000 winch.






We got the second chain on the other front tire! The young lady took over driving, she did a beautiful job of "feather-footing" the accelerator. Very gentle. Nice, with minimum wheelspin.

Josh winched. She drove. We worked with shovel and the Max Trax boards. Got the Nissan up that first big hill! Vehicles re-positioned. My Wrangler took over winch chores. Deliberately drove my Jeep into the ditch adjacent to the road, and got it well stuck, in order to be able to winch up the considerably larger and heavier Nissan. I have an inexpensive but powerful Engo 10k winch. It did a wonderful job of pulling that big Nissan up! She drove, I winched, and up it came! :)


Time to time we added a recovery strap, or two, to lengthen our reach with the winch.


I didn't get a photo of this, was too busy driving, but also towed the Nissan for about a half-mile up a couple of less-steep hills. My Jeep was in low range, first gear with the rear diff locked.

After four hours of work, using so many tools, we got the Nissan back to pavement! Today we used:
shovel
tire chains
recovery straps
winches (2)
Max Trax boards

And even my 5-gallon fuel can! The Nissan's V8 had burned through a lot of fuel, leaving the vehicle nearly empty. My Jerry can full of gas was very welcome, allowing the powerful V8 to assist with the hill climbing. It would have been a LOT tougher if we'd had to winch and pull the Armada up those hills without it working too.

I think what impressed me the most was the cool, calm teamwork demonstrated today. The two folks with the Nissan admitted that they knew little about four-wheeling, and had made a mistake even venturing onto that road, in these conditions. However, they were quick learners, listened well, and helped us, help them. The rest of us applied decades of four-wheeling knowledge to get them out, without damaging their vehicle, or ours. I reminded everyone that we were going to talk-through every move, do it right, not injure anyone or break anything expensive.

It all worked. Four hours of pretty intense, but not rushed, work. Vehicle is out. Family is all home and well. New friends were made and old friends had another good day of four-wheeling together. I rather enjoy these "rescue" missions. Always a challenge.

Lots of lessons learned by the new folks with their Nissan. :) I'm glad it all worked out for them. And for us.

Regards, Guy



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USA Joe
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Posted: January 01 2019 at 8:35pm | IP Logged Quote USA Joe

They were lucky to have you guys to come to da rescue !
as usual great pictures!!!     Joe

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Ham Gunner
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Posted: January 01 2019 at 8:49pm | IP Logged Quote Ham Gunner

Sounds like a lot of work, but that is what it takes sometimes. Glad everything worked out and nothing damaged or anyone hurt. Great work.

Being able to trade off winches so that they do not overheat is certainly a good thing. One can destroy a winch motor quickly by allowing them to overheat.

I used to have two Jeeps. A 1947 CJ-2A and a 1980 CJ-7. Both had winches, but neither winch was really up to that type of heavy use. I only had them for pulling myself out and then I usually done it via a double line pull to increase the pulling power.

I remember having the CJ-2A at deer camp one year when it rained for days on end. We were at camp about ready for lunch when I guy came walking up to camp, soaking wet. He had driven his International Scout down under a very long, steep log skidding trail and the Scout did not have tires that were really good enough for the muddy conditions.

We got him dried off beside our warm 55 gal. wood stove and filled him up with warm coffee and then my Buddy and myself and the hunter drove down to his Scout in my Willys. Willy had a small flathead 4 cylinder engine, had little weight, and skinny knobby tires and the hunter did not think it had a chance to pull his much heavier vehicle out. I knew that he had it in him to pull the Scout up the hill with a bit of help from the Scout itself to keep it moving. The Willy had 5.38 to 1 gear ratio, so that gave it the power it needed.

With only the weight of my Buddy and myself in Willy; at the end of about a 25 ft. log chain the Scout started out from under that big old steep muddy ridge. We did not slow down for anything and it was a wild ride, but Willy done his duty.

Off roading is fun, but one must first be prepared and certainly think things through before committing oneself to treacherous terrain.

Edited by Ham Gunner on January 01 2019 at 9:05pm


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turbo1889
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Posted: January 01 2019 at 10:22pm | IP Logged Quote turbo1889

As to winches overheating. That problem
is solved by metal gear train hydraulic
driven wenches with a hydraulic power
takeoff on the engine. Front end of the
engine belt driven hydraulic pump is
OKAYish but off the rear of the engine
through the main drive system is near bomb
proof.

Heck, I've seen one setup with an oil
cooler radiator on the low pressure return
line end of the hydraulic system which
would effectively mean you could run that
kind of setup on a near 100% around the
clock duty cycle so long as the winch
gearbox didn't overheat.

Also, one guy I know doesn't believe in
bumper mounted winches but prefers a pair
of portable units that basically have a
winch spool and gearbox with a chainsaw
engine attached to provide drive power.
They are convenient since you can just
slap a strap around any convenient tree
and hook up the winch and start winching.

I don't think those would overheat near as
much as an electric wench does. Although
probably not as good as hydraulic system
(but a blown hose on a hydraulic system or
similar creates it's own problems).

Edited by turbo1889 on January 01 2019 at 10:28pm


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M700
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 3:40pm | IP Logged Quote M700

Well cool! I haven't seen too many PTO winches.

Normally, as during this recovery operation, a few winch pulls was all that was required.

We didn't switch vehicles to save the winches. My son's rig just leapfrogged past mine and I took over winching. That Nissan needed some help.

Checked my 10k Engo winch, and his 8k Warn winch, a few times. No problem. No overheating. Recovered the vehicle no problem.

Several years ago, 2014, I used my winch 7 times in about an hour to get my Jeep out of a snow drift I'd driven into. Dumb driving on my part. The winch got warm, but, no problem. Got the Jeep out of there with some long, hard pulls. I did re-pack the winch gears with new grease afterwards. Probably needed it anyway.

By and large, the electric winches are the most popular and doggone it, they work great!

I highly encourage anyone who actually uses their 4x4 vehicle off-pavement, to get a good winch. And some other gear... As referenced in my original post.

Regards, Guy
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M700
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 3:51pm | IP Logged Quote M700

My buddy recently rebuilt this wonderful old one-ton Chevy pickup, converting it to a flat-bed.


He bought the front bumper, and mounted the awesome Warn 8274 Winch up front. It's an old-style winch, with 150' of cable, and a pretty fast line speed as I recall.

Out back, he built a custom mount, and slipped in a more compact Warn M-8000 winch.

I LIKE THAT!

Winches front and rear. Kinda wish we'd had him along when we did this recovery, but we did fine without his big rig.

So many winch pulls over the years, decades. Learn a lot.

Regards, Guy

Edited by M700 on January 02 2019 at 3:52pm
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M700
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 3:56pm | IP Logged Quote M700

My son, tugging/breaking a tree blocking another route, couple of years ago.



I cut most of the way through the tree with my bow saw. He tugged on it and broke it, clearing the route.

Winch only, I do not mean that he tugged by driving his Jeep!

These things are seriously useful!

Edited by M700 on January 02 2019 at 3:56pm
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KinleyWater
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 3:56pm | IP Logged Quote KinleyWater

Nomination for Guy as Hero of the Hour.

All facetiousness aside, they are fortunate to have had you. BZ

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M700
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 3:58pm | IP Logged Quote M700

Ha! Thanks.

They were fortunate to know a fellow who's deeply involved in the local 4wd community and he put the word out that some help was needed.

He's helped all of us at one point or another. Karma.

These young folks are good people, I'm glad we were able to help.

Guy
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KinleyWater
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 4:07pm | IP Logged Quote KinleyWater

Be honest - for some people, the uniform is just an outward sign of an inward commitment. People like that never really retire from service.



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turbo1889
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 7:19pm | IP Logged Quote turbo1889

Most of my experience with winches and
other guys (and a couple gals) who use
them besides myself is not for winching
vehicles but rather pulling logs out of
the woods for logs/poles as building
material or firewood. Spend a Summer day
from dawn to dusk winching 20+ foot long
logs out of the woods one right after the
other and up on to a triple axle gooseneck
trailer for building a log structure and
the electric winches start having issues.
But that is mainly due to "red neck DIY
logging" with them which is pressing them
into service for a job that they were
probably never intended for.

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M700
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Posted: January 02 2019 at 11:03pm | IP Logged Quote M700

Yup - they're not intended for that sort of use.

I'd have something else too - if I did that sort of work!

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STCM(SW)
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Posted: January 05 2019 at 10:42pm | IP Logged Quote STCM(SW)

Try going with a scistic nerve pain for 8 or 9 weeks like I did!
Man, couldn't bend over to to put on underwear, socks or shoes for a time.
Shooting? Forgetabout it!




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M700
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Posted: January 06 2019 at 9:44am | IP Logged Quote M700

STCM(SW) wrote:
Try going with a scistic nerve pain for 8 or 9 weeks like I did!
Man, couldn't bend over to to put on underwear, socks or shoes for a time.
Shooting? Forgetabout it!




I think you meant this for the rifle/prone/pain shooting post I did down in long guns? Instead of up here with my Jeep post?

Sorry to learn that you had that pain. It's a rough one to deal with!

Guy
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